Ohio Lawsuit Loans | Pre Settlement Loans | Lawsuit Funding

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Availability of Services in OH:

  1. Plaintiff Verdicts on Appeal: YES
  2. Structured Settlements: YES
  3. Lawsuit Lending: YES
  4. Funding on Settled Case: YES
  5. Ohio Workers Compensation: YES
  1. Litigation Funding: YES
  2. Legal Fees: YES
  3. Law Firm Loans: YES
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What Are Pre Settlement Loans?

TriMark Legal Funding LLC is proud to offer top notch lawsuit loans, legal financing, attorney funding, litigation finance for attorneys and law cash in all major cities in Ohio including Akron, Alliance, Ashland, Ashtabula, Athens, Barberton, Beavercreek, Boardman, Bowling Green, Brook Park, Brunswick, Canton, Centerville, Chillicothe, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Cleveland Heights, Columbus, Cuyahoga Falls, Dayton, Delaware, Dublin, East Cleveland, Elyria, Euclid, Fairborn, Fairfield, Findlay, Gahanna, Garfield Heights, Green, Hamilton, Hilliard, Huber Heights, Hudson, Kent, Kettering, Lakewood, Lancaster, Lima, Lorain, Mansfield, Maple Heights, Marion, Mason, Massillon, Medina, Mentor, Newark, Niles, North Olmsted, North Ridgeville, North Royalton, Norwood, Oxford, Parma, Parma Heights, Piqua, Portsmouth, Reynoldsburg, Riverside, Rocky River, Sandusky, Shaker Heights, Solon, South Euclid, Springfield, Stow, Strongsville, Toledo, Trotwood, Troy, Upper Arlington, Warren, Westerville, Westlake, Willoughby, Wooster, Xenia and Zanesville and we offer oasis loans.

<North Dakota> Ohio <Oklahoma>

Quick Facts About Ohio

Capital City:
Columbus

Population & Density:
As per 2004 census estimate, the population is above 11.5 million and its growing everyday. Population density is 277.3 persons per sq mi.

Largest Cities:
Columbus, Cleveland, Akron, Dayton, Parma, Youngstown, Canton, Lorain, Cincinnati, Toledo
Natural Treasures:
Gem - Flint

Ohio Motto:
With God, All Things Are Possible

State Symbols:
Bird - Cardinal
Animal - White Tail Deer
Flower - Red Carnation
Tree - Buckeye
Song - "Beautiful Ohio"
Ohio Attorney General
State Office Tower
30 E. Broad St
Columbus, OH 43266-0410
(614) 466-4320
http://www.ohioattorneygeneral.gov/
Ohio
OH - Ohio

Pre Settlement Funding in Ohio

If you have been hurt in an accident and now you're tied up in a lawsuit but you're all out of money and you need cash now but you can't wait any longer for your case to settle, TriMark Legal Funding LLC can help.

We offer lawsuit loans from $500 to $500,000 in as little as 24-48 hours with no credit check, now monthly payments and no risk!

State-Specific Restrictions on Lawsuit Loans & Legal Loans

Workers comp settlement advances ARE AVAILABLE
Other known funding restrictions: NONE

Types of Cases Eligible For Lawsuit Funding


Noteworthy facts about Ohio:

[1] Ohio is a state in the Midwestern United States. Ohio is the 34th largest (by area), the 7th most populous, and the 10th most densely populated of the 50 United States. The state's capital and largest city is Columbus.

The name "Ohio" originated from Iroquois word ohi-yo', meaning "great river" or "large creek". The state, originally partitioned from the Northwest Territory, was admitted to the Union as the 17th state (and the first under the Northwest Ordinance) on March 1, 1803. Although there are conflicting narratives regarding the origin of the nickname, Ohio is historically known as the "Buckeye State" (relating to the Ohio buckeye tree) and Ohioans are also known as "Buckeyes".

The government of Ohio is composed of the executive branch, led by the Governor; the legislative branch, which comprises the Ohio General Assembly; and the judicial branch, which is led by the Supreme Court. Currently, Ohio occupies 16 seats in the United States House of Representatives. Ohio is known for its status as both a swing state and a bellwether in national elections.

Ohio's geographic location has proven to be an asset for economic growth and expansion. Because Ohio links the Northeast to the Midwest, much cargo and business traffic passes through its borders along its well-developed highways. Ohio has the nation's 10th largest highway network, and is within a one-day drive of 50% of North America's population and 70% of North America's manufacturing capacity. To the north, Lake Erie gives Ohio 312 miles (502 km) of coastline, which allows for numerous cargo ports.

Ohio's southern border is defined by the Ohio River (with the border being at the 1793 low-water mark on the north side of the river), and much of the northern border is defined by Lake Erie. Ohio's neighbors are Pennsylvania to the east, Michigan to the northwest, Ontario Canada, to the north, Indiana to the west, Kentucky on the south, and West Virginia on the southeast. Ohio's borders were defined by metes and bounds in the Enabling Act of 1802 as follows:

Bounded on the east by the Pennsylvania line, on the south by the Ohio River, to the mouth of the Great Miami River, on the west by the line drawn due north from the mouth of the Great Miami aforesaid, and on the north by an east and west line drawn through the southerly extreme of Lake Michigan, running east after intersecting the due north line aforesaid, from the mouth of the Great Miami until it shall intersect Lake Erie or the territorial line, and thence with the same through Lake Erie to the Pennsylvania line aforesaid.

Ohio is bounded by the Ohio River, but nearly all of the river itself belongs to Kentucky and West Virginia. In 1980, the U.S. Supreme Court held that, based on the wording of the cessation of territory by Virginia (which at that time included what is now Kentucky and West Virginia), the boundary between Ohio and Kentucky (and, by implication, West Virginia) is the northern low-water mark of the river as it existed in 1792. Ohio has only that portion of the river between the river's 1792 low-water mark and the present high-water mark.

The border with Michigan has also changed, as a result of the Toledo War, to angle slightly northeast to the north shore of the mouth of the Maumee River.

Much of Ohio features glaciated plains, with an exceptionally flat area in the northwest being known as the Great Black Swamp. This glaciated region in the northwest and central state is bordered to the east and southeast first by a belt known as the glaciated Allegheny Plateau, and then by another belt known as the unglaciated Allegheny Plateau. Most of Ohio is of low relief, but the unglaciated Allegheny Plateau features rugged hills and forests.

The rugged southeastern quadrant of Ohio, stretching in an outward bow-like arc along the Ohio River from the West Virginia Panhandle to the outskirts of Cincinnati, forms a distinct socio-economic unit. Geologically similar to parts of West Virginia and southwestern Pennsylvania, this area's coal mining legacy, dependence on small pockets of old manufacturing establishments, and distinctive regional dialect set this section off from the rest of the state.

In 1965 the United States Congress passed the Appalachian Regional Development Act, at attempt to "address the persistent poverty and growing economic despair of the Appalachian Region."[30] This act defines 29 Ohio counties as part of Appalachia. While 1/3 of Ohio's land mass is part of the federally defined Appalachian region, only 12.8% of Ohioans live there (1.476 million people.)

Significant rivers within the state include the Cuyahoga River, Great Miami River, Maumee River, Muskingum River, and Scioto River. The rivers in the northern part of the state drain into the northern Atlantic Ocean via Lake Erie and the St. Lawrence River, and the rivers in the southern part of the state drain into the Gulf of Mexico via the Ohio River and then the Mississippi.

Grand Lake St. Marys in the west central part of the state was constructed as a supply of water for canals in the canal-building era of 1820–1850. For many years this body of water, over 20 square miles (52 km2), was the largest artificial lake in the world. It should be noted that Ohio's canal-building projects were not the economic fiasco that similar efforts were in other states. Some cities, such as Dayton, owe their industrial emergence to location on canals, and as late as 1910 interior canals carried much of the bulk freight of the state. [1]

Sources:

[1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ohio